Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/14663
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dc.contributor.authorPimenta, Natalia Camps-
dc.contributor.authorAntunes, André Pinassi-
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Adrian Ashton-
dc.contributor.authorMacedo, Valêncio W.-
dc.contributor.authorShepard, Glenn Harvey-
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-24T17:00:02Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-24T17:00:02Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/14663-
dc.description.abstractCommercial hunting for the international trade in animal hides in the 20th century decimated many populations of aquatic wildlife in Amazonia. However, impacts varied significantly between different species and regions, depending upon hunting intensity, accessibility of habitat, and the inherent resilience of various species and their habitats. We investigated the differential responses of two Amazonian Mustelid species, the neotropical otter and giant otter, to commercial hunting pressure along the upper Rio Negro in Brazil, and examined historical factors that influenced spatial and temporal variation in commercial exploitation. We analyzed previously unanalyzed data from historical records of hide shipments to track changes in hide sales and prices for the two species in the late 20th century. We also gathered oral histories from older Baniwa people who had witnessed or participated in commercial otter hunting. These complimentary data sources reveal how intrinsic biological and social characteristics of the two otter species interacted with market forces and regional history. Whereas giant otter populations were driven to local or regional extinction during the late 20th century by commercial hunting, neotropical otters persisted. In recent decades, giant otter populations have returned to some parts of the upper Rio Negro, a development which local people welcome as part of a generalized recovery of the ecosystems in their territory as a result of the banning of animal pelt exports and indigenous land demarcation. This paper expands the scope of the field historical ecology and reflects on the role of local knowledge in biodiversity conservation. © 2018 Pimenta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.language.isoenpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofVolume 13, Número 3pt_BR
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Brazil*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/br/*
dc.subjectBehavior, Animalsen
dc.subjectAnimals Huntingen
dc.subjectEcologyen
dc.subjectFuren
dc.subjectHistoryen
dc.subjectNeotropicsen
dc.subjectNonhumanen
dc.subjectOtteren
dc.subjectPsychological Resilienceen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subjectSocial Interactionen
dc.subjectSpatio-temporal Analysisen
dc.subjectSpecies Extinctionen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectCommercial Phenomenaen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectEcosystemen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Protectionen
dc.subjectHumanen
dc.subjectPhysiologyen
dc.subjectAnimalssen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectCommerceen
dc.subjectConservation Of Natural Resourcesen
dc.subjectEcosystemen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectOttersen
dc.titleDifferential resilience of Amazonian otters along the Rio Negro in the aftermath of the 20th century international fur tradeen
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0193984-
dc.publisher.journalPLoS ONEpt_BR
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