Use este identificador para citar ou linkar para este item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/18449
Título: Trypanosoma cruzi in Brazilian Amazonia: Lineages TCI and TCIIa in wild primates, Rhodnius spp. and in humans with Chagas disease associated with oral transmission
Autor: Marcili, Arlei
Valente, Vera da Costa
Valente, Sebastiäo Aldo S.
Junqueira, Ângela Cristina Veríssimo
Silva, Flávia Maia da
Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves
Naiff, Roberto Daibes
Campaner, Marta
Coura, José Rodrigues
Camargo, Erney Plessmann
Miles, Michael Alexander
Teixeira, Marta Maria Geraldes
Palavras-chave: Biogeography
Chagas Disease
Cytochrome
Disease Transmission
Dna
Hominid
Insect
Pathology
Phylogenetics
Phylogeny
Primate
Protozoan
Animal
Aotidae
Cebidae
Chagas Disease
Cytochromes B
Dna, Protozoan
Genotype
Humans
Insect Vectors
Monkey Diseases
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Genetic
Primates
Random Amplified Polymorphic Dna Technique
Rhodnius
Saguinus
Species Specificity
Trypanosoma Cruzi
Amazonia
South America
Cytochrome B
Protozoal Dna
Animals
Aotidae
Cebidae
Chagas Disease
Classification
Disease Carrier
Polymorphism, Genetic
Genetics
Genotype
Human
Isolation And Purification
Monkey Diseases
Parasitology
Phylogeny
Primate
Procedures
Random Amplified Polymorphic Dna
Rhodnius
Saguinus
Species Difference
Transmission
Trypanosoma Cruzi
Veterinary
Animal
Aotidae
Cebidae
Chagas Disease
Cytochromes B
Dna, Protozoan
Genotype
Humans
Insect Vectors
Monkey Diseases
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Genetic
Primates
Random Amplified Polymorphic Dna Technique
Rhodnius
Saguinus
Species Specificity
Trypanosoma Cruzi
Data do documento: 2009
Revista: International Journal for Parasitology
Encontra-se em: Volume 39, Número 5, Pags. 615-623
Abstract: In this study, we provide phylogenetic and biogeographic evidence that the Trypanosoma cruzi lineages T. cruzi I (TCI) and T. cruzi IIa (TCIIa) circulate amongst non-human primates in Brazilian Amazonia, and are transmitted by Rhodnius species in overlapping arboreal transmission cycles, sporadically infecting humans. TCI presented higher prevalence rates, and no lineages other than TCI and TCIIa were found in this study in wild monkeys and Rhodnius from the Amazonian region. We characterised TCI and TCIIa from wild primates (16 TCI and five TCIIa), Rhodnius spp. (13 TCI and nine TCIIa), and humans with Chagas disease associated with oral transmission (14 TCI and five TCIIa) in Brazilian Amazonia. To our knowledge, TCIIa had not been associated with wild monkeys until now. Polymorphisms of ssrDNA, cytochrome b gene sequences and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns clearly separated TCIIa from TCIIb-e and TCI lineages, and disclosed small intra-lineage polymorphisms amongst isolates from Amazonia. These data are important in understanding the complexity of the transmission cycles, genetic structure, and evolutionary history of T. cruzi populations circulating in Amazonia, and they contribute to both the unravelling of human infection routes and the pathological peculiarities of Chagas disease in this region. © 2008 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc.
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2008.09.015
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