Use este identificador para citar ou linkar para este item: http://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/123/2462
Título: Anthropogenic Landscape in Southeastern Amazonia: Contemporary Impacts of Low-Intensity Harvesting and Dispersal of Brazil Nuts by the Kayapó Indigenous People
Autor(es): RIBEIRO, MARIA BEATRIZ N.
JEROZOLIMSKI, ADRIANO
DE ROBERT, PASCALE
SALLES, NILSON V.
KAYAPÓ, BIRIBIRI
PIMENTEL, TANIA P.
William Ernest Magnusson
Assunto: Kayapo
Indigenous
ISSN: 1932-6203
Revista: Plos One
Volume: 9
Resumo: Brazil nut, the Bertholletia excelsa seed, is one of the most important non-timber forest products in the Amazon Forest and the livelihoods of thousands of traditional Amazonian families depend on its commercialization. B. excelsa has been frequently cited as an indicator of anthropogenic forests and there is strong evidence that past human management has significantly contributed to its present distribution across the Amazon, suggesting that low levels of harvesting may play a positive role in B. excelsa recruitment. Here, we evaluate the effects of Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapo Indigenous people of southeastern Amazonia on seedling recruitment in 20 B. excelsa groves subjected to different harvesting intensities, and investigated if management by harvesters influences patterns of B. excelsa distribution. The number of years of low-intensity Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapo over the past two decades was positively related to B. excelsa seedling density in groves. One of the mechanisms behind the higher seedling density in harvested sites seems to be seed dispersal by harvesters along trails. The Kayapo also intentionally plant B. excelsa seeds and seedlings across their territories. Our results show not only that low-intensity Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapo people does not reduce recruitment of seedlings, but that harvesting and/or associated activities conducted by traditional harvesters may benefit B. excelsa beyond grove borders. Our study supports the hypothesis that B. excelsa dispersal throughout the Amazon was, at least in part, influenced by indigenous groups, and strongly suggests that current human management contributes to the maintenance and formation of B. excelsa groves. We suggest that changes in Brazil nut management practices by traditional people to prevent harvesting impacts may be unnecessary and even counterproductive in many areas, and should be carefully evaluated before implementation.
URI: http://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/123/2462
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102187
Aparece nas coleções:Coordenação de Biodiversidade (CBIO)

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