Use este identificador para citar ou linkar para este item: http://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/123/3875
Título: Secondary Forests on Anthropogenic Soils of the Middle Madeira River: Valuation, Local Knowledge, and Landscape Domestication in Brazilian Amazonia
Autor(es): Junqueira, André Braga
Shepard, Glenn Harvey
Charles Roland Clement
Assunto: Terra preta de índio
Etnobotânica
ISSN: 0013-0001
Revista: Economic Botany
Volume: 65
Resumo: Secondary Forests on Anthropogenic Soils of the Middle Madeira River: Valuation, Local Knowledge, and Landscape Domestication in Brazilian Amazonia. Anthropogenic forests and soils are widespread throughout Amazonia and are the product of the landscape domestication process carried out by Amazonian societies since pre-Colombian times. Areas of Terra Preta de Índio (TPI, Amazonian Dark Earths) are recognized by local rural residents and associated with specific forms of use and management of these soils and associated secondary forests. We used a quantitative approach to investigate how secondary forests on TPI are recognized and used by local residents along the middle Madeira River, Central Amazonia. Sixty-two residents were interviewed in three riverside communities and listed the ethnospecies and their uses in secondary forests on TPI and on non-anthropogenic soils (NAS). Local residents mentioned more ethnospecies on TPI (mean ± standard deviation: 19.5 ± 8.9) than on NAS (17.4 ± 8.5), and the use value of the environment to the informants (UVia) was higher on TPI (19 ± 5.7) than on NAS (16.2 ± 6.0). Eleven ethnospecies were classified as anthropogenic soil indicators, among which three intensively used palms are widely recognized as indicators of anthropogenic areas and two are domesticated to some degree. The intimate and lasting interactions between humans and TPI have favored the maintenance of secondary forests in these domesticated landscapes with a diverse assemblage of useful and domesticated species. Rural residents in Amazonia recognize these forests as an important source of food and other resources. The use, management, and traditional knowledge related to these domesticated landscapes may provide useful information for the understanding of Amazonian historical ecology and for the design of more efficient biodiversity management and conservation plans.
URI: http://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/123/3875
ISSN: 0013-0001
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12231-010-9138-8
Aparece nas coleções:Coordenação de Tecnologia e Inovação (COTI)

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