Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/14644
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dc.contributor.authorSantos, Fernanda da Silva-
dc.contributor.authorCarbone, Chris-
dc.contributor.authorWearn, Oliver R.-
dc.contributor.authorRowcliffe, Justin Marcus-
dc.contributor.authorEspinosa, Santiago-
dc.contributor.authorLima, Marcela Guimarães Moreira-
dc.contributor.authorAhumada, Jorge A.-
dc.contributor.authorGonçalves, André Luis Sousa-
dc.contributor.authorTrevelin, Leonardo Carreira-
dc.contributor.authorÁlvarez-Loayza, Patricia-
dc.contributor.authorSpironello, Wilson Roberto-
dc.contributor.authorJansen, Patrick A.-
dc.contributor.authorJuen, Leandro-
dc.contributor.authorPeres, Carlos A.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-24T16:59:53Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-24T16:59:53Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/14644-
dc.description.abstractCarnivores have long been used as model organisms to examine mechanisms that allow coexistence among ecologically similar species. Interactions between carnivores, including competition and predation, comprise important processes regulating local community structure and diversity. We use data from an intensive camera-trapping monitoring program across eight Neotropical forest sites to describe the patterns of spatiotemporal organization of a guild of five sympatric cat species: jaguar (Panthera onca), puma (Puma concolor), ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) and margay (Leopardus wiedii). For the three largest cat species, we developed multi-stage occupancy models accounting for habitat characteristics (landscape complexity and prey availability) and models accounting for species interactions (occupancy estimates of potential competitor cat species). Patterns of habitat-use were best explained by prey availability, rather than habitat structure or species interactions, with no evidence of negative associations of jaguar on puma and ocelot occupancy or puma on ocelot occupancy. We further explore temporal activity patterns and overlap of all five felid species. We observed a moderate temporal overlap between jaguar, puma and ocelot, with differences in their activity peaks, whereas higher temporal partitioning was observed between jaguarundi and both ocelot and margay. Lastly, we conducted temporal overlap analysis and calculated species activity levels across study sites to explore if shifts in daily activity within species can be explained by varying levels of local competition pressure. Activity patterns of ocelots, jaguarundis and margays were similarly bimodal across sites, but pumas exhibited irregular activity patterns, most likely as a response to jaguar activity. Activity levels were similar among sites and observed differences were unrelated to competition or intraguild killing risk. Our study reveals apparent spatial and temporal partitioning for most of the species pairs analyzed, with prey abundance being more important than species interactions in governing the local occurrence and spatial distribution of Neotropical forest felids. © 2019 Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.language.isoenpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofVolume 14, Número 3pt_BR
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Brazil*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/br/*
dc.subjectAnimals Trappingen
dc.subjectCaten
dc.subjectForesten
dc.subjectHabitat Structureen
dc.subjectHabitat Useen
dc.subjectInterspecific Competitionen
dc.subjectIntraguild Predationen
dc.subjectJaguaren
dc.subjectJuguarundien
dc.subjectLandscapeen
dc.subjectMargayen
dc.subjectNeotropicsen
dc.subjectNonhumanen
dc.subjectOceloten
dc.subjectOrganismal Interactionen
dc.subjectPrey Searchingen
dc.subjectPumaen
dc.subjectSpatio-temporal Analysisen
dc.subjectSpecies Coexistenceen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectBody Weighten
dc.subjectCarnivoraen
dc.subjectFelidaeen
dc.subjectForesten
dc.subjectGeographyen
dc.subjectPantheraen
dc.subjectPhysiologyen
dc.subjectPredationen
dc.subjectSpecies Differenceen
dc.subjectTropic Climateen
dc.subjectAnimalssen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectBody Weighten
dc.subjectCarnivoraen
dc.subjectFelidaeen
dc.subjectForestsen
dc.subjectGeographyen
dc.subjectPantheraen
dc.subjectPredatory Behavioren
dc.subjectPumaen
dc.subjectSpecies Specificityen
dc.subjectTropical Climateen
dc.titlePrey availability and temporal partitioning modulate felid coexistence in Neotropical forestsen
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0213671-
dc.publisher.journalPLoS ONEpt_BR
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