Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/15380
Title: Behavioral patterns, parity rate and natural infection analysis in anopheline species involved in the transmission of malaria in the northeastern Brazilian Amazon region
Authors: Barbosa, Ledayane Mayana Costa
Souto, R. N.P.
Ferreira, Ricardo Marcelo dos Anjos
Scarpassa, Vera Margarete
Keywords: Behavioral Ecology
Disease Transmission
Disease Vector
Infectivity
Malaria
Mosquito
Adult
Amazonas
Behavior, Animals
Anopheles
Anopheles Braziliensis
Anopheles Darlingi
Anopheles Forattinii
Anopheles Intermedius
Anopheles Marajoara
Anopheles Mediopunctatus
Anopheles Nuneztovari
Anopheles Oswaldoi
Anopheles Peryassui
Anopheles Triannulatus
Controlled Study
Disease Transmission
Female
Infection Rate
Malaria
Nonhuman
Parity
Plasmodium
Population Abundance
Species Distribution
Species Dominance
Animals
Anopheles
Brasil
Egg Laying
Feeding Behavior
Growth, Development And Aging
Human
Insect Bite
Insect Vector
Malaria
Ovary
Parasitology
Physiology
Season
Sentinel Surveillance
Species Difference
Transmission
Amazonia
Brasil
Anopheles Braziliensis
Anopheles Darlingi
Anopheles Marajoara
Anopheles Nuneztovari
Cora
Nyssorhynchus
Rain
Animal
Anopheles
Brasil
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Insect Bites And Stings
Insect Vectors
Malaria
Ovary
Oviposition
Parity
Plasmodium
Rain
Seasons
Sentinel Surveillance
Species Specificity
Issue Date: 2016
metadata.dc.publisher.journal: Acta Tropica
metadata.dc.relation.ispartof: Volume 164, Pags. 216-225
Abstract: The characterization of behavioral patterns allows a better understanding of the transmission dynamics and the design of more effective malaria vector control strategies. This study analyzed the behavioral patterns of the Anopheles species of the Coração district situated in the northeast of the Brazilian Amazon region. The behavioral patterns of the anopheline species were measured based on the 36 collection sites of this district from December 2010 to November 2011. Collections of four hours for three consecutive nights each month and four 12-h collections, comprising two in the rainy season and two in the dry season, were performed. Furthermore, to infer the anthropophily and zoophily indexes, four additional four-hour collections were performed. The samples were also evaluated for parity rate and natural infectivity for Plasmodium spp. A total of 1689 anophelines were captured, comprising of nine species and two subgenera (Nyssorhynchus – six species, and Anopheles – three species). Anopheles darlingi was the most abundant and widely distributed species in the area, followed by A. braziliensis and A.marajoara. Anopheles darlingi and A. marajoara were the only species present in the four collections of 12-h, but only A. darlingi showed activity throughout night. Anopheles darlingi was the most anthropophilic species (AI = 0.40), but the zoophily index was higher (ZI = 0.60), revealing an eclectic and opportunistic behavior. Of the six most frequent species, A. nuneztovari s.l. was the most zoophilic species (ZI = 1.00). All captured species showed predominance towards biting in outdoor environments. Anopheles darlingi and A. braziliensis showed multimodal biting peaks, whereas A. marajoara revealed a stable pattern, with the biting peak after sunset. Using the PCR technique, no anopheline was found infected with the malaria parasite. Since A. darlingi and A. marajoara are recognized as important vectors in this region, the district of Coração may be considered as a highly potent area for transmission of malaria, therefore, the prevention and surveillance measures should be taken constantly to prevent the same. The role of A. braziliensis as malaria vector needs to be urgently investigated. © 2016
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2016.09.018
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