Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/16595
Title: Amazonian trees show increased edge effects due to Atlantic Ocean warming and northward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone since 1980
Authors: Albiero-Júnior, Alci
Camargo, José Luís Campana
Roig, Fidel Alejandro
Schöngart, Jochen
Pinto, Renan Mercuri
Venegas-González, Alejandro
Mario, Tomazello-filho,
Keywords: Climate Change
Drought
Ecosystems
Oceanography
Surface Waters
Atlantic Ocean
Dendroclimatology
Forest Fragmentations
Forest Fragments
Tree Rings
Forestry
Rain
Anthropogenic Effect
Dendroclimatology
Displacement
Edge Effect
Global Warming
Habitat Fragmentation
Intertropical Convergence Zone
Tree
Tree Ring
Amazonas
Atlantic Ocean
Climate Change
Controlled Study
Environmental Factor
Environmental Monitoring
Environmental Temperature
Forest Management
Geographic Distribution
Greenhouse Effect
Nonhuman
Plant Parameters
Precipitation
Priority Journal
Scleronema Micranthum
Summer
Tree
Tree Growth
Brasil
Climate Change
Growth, Development And Aging
Malvaceae
Rainforest
Tree
Tropic Climate
Amazon River
Atlantic Ocean
Malvaceae
Scleronema Micranthum
Brasil
Climate Change
Malvaceae
Rain
Rainforest
Trees
Tropical Climate
Issue Date: 2019
metadata.dc.publisher.journal: Science of the Total Environment
metadata.dc.relation.ispartof: Volume 693
Abstract: Recent investigations indicate a warming of Atlantic Ocean surface waters since 1980, probably influenced by anthropic actions, inducing rainfall intensification mainly during the rainy season and slight reductions during the dry season in the Amazon. Under these climate changes, trees in upland forests (terra firme) could benefit from the intensification of the hydrological cycle and could also be affected by the reduction of precipitation during the dry season. Results of dendrochronological analyses, spatial correlations and structural equation models, showed that Scleronema micranthum (Ducke) Ducke (Malvaceae) trees exposed in fragmented areas and to edge effects in Central Amazonian terra firme forest were more sensitive to the increase in the Atlantic Ocean surface temperature and consequent northward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, mainly during the dry season. Therefore, we proved that in altered and potentially more stressful environments such as edges of fragmented forests, recent anthropogenic climatic changes are exerting pressure on tree growth dynamics, inducing alterations in their performance and, consequently, in essential processes related to ecosystem services. Changes that could affect human well-being, highlighting the need for strategies that reduce edge areas expansion in Amazon forests and anthropic climate changes of the Anthropocene. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.07.321
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