Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/17439
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dc.contributor.authorFrausin, Gina-
dc.contributor.authorHidalgo, Ari de Freitas-
dc.contributor.authorLima, Renata Braga Souza-
dc.contributor.authorKinupp, Valdely Ferreira-
dc.contributor.authorMing, Linchau-
dc.contributor.authorPohlit, Adrian Martin-
dc.contributor.authorMilliken, William-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-15T21:42:48Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-15T21:42:48Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/17439-
dc.description.abstractBackground In this article we present the plants used for the treatment of malaria and associated symptoms in Santa Isabel do Rio Negro in the Brazilian Amazon. The region has important biological and cultural diversities including more than twenty indigenous ethnic groups and a strong history in traditional medicine. Objective The aims of this study are to survey information in the Baniwa, Baré, Desana, Piratapuia, Tariana, Tukano, Tuyuca and Yanomami ethnic communities and among caboclos (mixed-ethnicity) on (a) plant species used for the treatment of malaria and associated symptoms, (b) dosage forms and (c) distribution of these anti-malarial plants in the Amazon. Methods Information was obtained through classical ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacological methods from interviews with 146 informants in Santa Isabel municipality on the upper Negro River, Brazil. Results Fifty-five mainly native neotropical plant species from 34 families were in use. The detailed uses of these plants were documented. The result was 187 records (64.5%) of plants for the specific treatment of malaria, 51 records (17.6%) of plants used in the treatment of liver problems and 29 records (10.0%) of plants used in the control of fevers associated with malaria. Other uses described were blood fortification ('dar sangue'), headache and prophylaxis. Most of the therapeutic preparations were decoctions and infusions based on stem bark, root bark and leaves. These were administered by mouth. In some cases, remedies were prepared with up to three different plant species. Also, plants were used together with other ingredients such as insects, mammals, gunpowder and milk. Conclusion This is the first study on the anti-malarial plants from this region of the Amazon. Aspidosperma spp. and Ampelozizyphus amazonicus Ducke were the most cited species in the communities surveyed. These species have experimental proof supporting their anti-malarial efficacy. The dosage of the therapeutic preparations depends on the kind of plant, quantity of plant material available, the patient's age (children and adults) and the local expert. The treatment time varies from a single dose to up to several weeks. Most anti-malarial plants are domesticated or grow spontaneously. They are grown in home gardens, open areas near the communities, clearings and secondary forests, and wild species grow in areas of seasonally flooded wetlands and terra firme ('solid ground') forest, in some cases in locations that are hard to access. Traditional knowledge of plants was found to be falling into disuse presumably as a consequence of the local official health services that treat malaria in the communities using commercial drugs. Despite this, some species are used in the prevention of this disease and also in the recovery after using conventional anti-malarial drugs. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.language.isoenpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofVolume 174, Pags. 238-252pt_BR
dc.rightsRestrito*
dc.subjectAntimalarial Agenten
dc.subjectAspidosperma Desmanthum Extracten
dc.subjectAspidosperma Olivaceum Extracten
dc.subjectAspidosperma Vargasii Extracten
dc.subjectCarapa Guianensis Aubl Extracten
dc.subjectCroton Cajucara Benth Extracten
dc.subjectCymbopogon Citratus Extracten
dc.subjectEuterpe Precatoria Mart Extracten
dc.subjectInsect Repellenten
dc.subjectPlant Extracten
dc.subjectQuassia Amara Extracten
dc.subjectStachytarpheta Cayennensis Extracten
dc.subjectSweet Orange Extracten
dc.subjectUnclassified Drugen
dc.subjectAntimalarial Agenten
dc.subjectAcanthospermumen
dc.subjectAmpelozizyphus Amazonicusen
dc.subjectAmpelozizyphus Amazonicus Extracten
dc.subjectAnadenanthera Peregrinaen
dc.subjectAnemiaen
dc.subjectAniba Canelillaen
dc.subjectAntimalarial Activityen
dc.subjectAraceaeen
dc.subjectArecaceaeen
dc.subjectAspidospermaen
dc.subjectAsteraceaeen
dc.subjectAstrocaryum Aculeatumen
dc.subjectAstrocaryum Mumbacaen
dc.subjectAvocadoen
dc.subjectBarken
dc.subjectBeeten
dc.subjectBidens Cynapiifolia Kunthen
dc.subjectBignoniaceaeen
dc.subjectBlack Pepperen
dc.subjectBonamia Ferrugineaen
dc.subjectBrazil Nuten
dc.subjectBrazilianen
dc.subjectCarapa Guianensisen
dc.subjectCecropiaen
dc.subjectChenopodium Ambrosioidesen
dc.subjectCommunity Structureen
dc.subjectConvolvulaceaeen
dc.subjectCostaceaeen
dc.subjectCostus Spicatusen
dc.subjectCrassulaceaeen
dc.subjectCroton Cajucara Benthen
dc.subjectCroton Sacaquinha Croizaten
dc.subjectCucurbitaceaeen
dc.subjectCymbopogon Citratusen
dc.subjectDrug Dosage Formen
dc.subjectEndopleura Uchien
dc.subjectEryngium Foetidumen
dc.subjectErythroxylaceaeen
dc.subjectErythroxylum Coca Lamen
dc.subjectEugenia Unifloraen
dc.subjectEuphorbiaceaeen
dc.subjectEuterpe Oleracea Marten
dc.subjectEuterpe Precatoria Marten
dc.subjectFabaceaeen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectFeveren
dc.subjectForesten
dc.subjectFridericia Chicaen
dc.subjectGenipa Americanaen
dc.subjectGuarea Pubescensen
dc.subjectHeadacheen
dc.subjectHeteropsisen
dc.subjectHumanen
dc.subjectIndigenous Peopleen
dc.subjectKalanchoe Pinnataen
dc.subjectLauraceaeen
dc.subjectLime (fruit)en
dc.subjectLippia Albaen
dc.subjectLuffa Operculataen
dc.subjectMalariaen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMalvaceaeen
dc.subjectManihot Esculenta Crantzen
dc.subjectMedicinal Planten
dc.subjectMeliaceaeen
dc.subjectMenispermaceaeen
dc.subjectMyrtaceaeen
dc.subjectNonhumanen
dc.subjectPassifloraen
dc.subjectPhilodendron Goeldiien
dc.subjectPhysalis Angulataen
dc.subjectPlant Leafen
dc.subjectPlant Rooten
dc.subjectPlasmodium Falciparumen
dc.subjectPlasmodium Vivaxen
dc.subjectPlectranthusen
dc.subjectPortulaca Pilosaen
dc.subjectProphylaxisen
dc.subjectQuassia Amaraen
dc.subjectSennaen
dc.subjectSimaroubaceaeen
dc.subjectSolanaceaeen
dc.subjectSour Orangeen
dc.subjectStachytarpheta Cayennensisen
dc.subjectSweet Orangeen
dc.subjectTheobroma Subincanumen
dc.subjectUncaria Guianensisen
dc.subjectVerbenaceaeen
dc.subjectVernonia Condensata Bakeren
dc.subjectWetlanden
dc.subjectWild Speciesen
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen
dc.subjectAmpelopsisen
dc.subjectEthnobotanyen
dc.subjectEthnologyen
dc.subjectIsolation And Purificationen
dc.subjectMalariaen
dc.subjectProceduresen
dc.subjectQuestionnairesen
dc.subjectRiveren
dc.subjectAmpelozizyphus Amazonicusen
dc.subjectAspidospermaen
dc.subjectAmpelopsisen
dc.subjectAntimalarialsen
dc.subjectAspidospermaen
dc.subjectEthnobotanyen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIndians, South Americanen
dc.subjectMalariaen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectPlants, Medicinalen
dc.subjectRiversen
dc.subjectSurveys And Questionnairesen
dc.titleAn ethnobotanical study of anti-malarial plants among indigenous people on the upper Negro River in the Brazilian Amazonen
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jep.2015.07.033-
dc.publisher.journalJournal of Ethnopharmacologypt_BR
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