Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/17726
Title: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities along a pedo-hydrological gradient in a Central Amazonian terra firme forest
Authors: Oliveira Freitas, Rejane de
Buscardo, Erika
Nagy, László
dos Santos Maciel, Alex Bruno
Carrenho, Rosilaine
Luizâo, Regina Celi Costa
Keywords: Abundance
Arbuscular Mycorrhiza
Community Composition
Host Specificity
Plant
Rainforest
Relative Abundance
Soil Moisture
Soil Texture
Spore
Amazonia
Acaulospora
Arbuscular
Bacteria (microorganisms)
Fungi
Glomus
Biodiversity
Brasil
Chemistry
Classification
Cytology
Fungus Spore
Microbiology
Mycorrhiza
Ph
Physiology
Soil
Tree
Biodiversity
Brasil
Hydrogen-ion Concentration
Mycorrhizae
Soil
Soil Microbiology
Spores, Fungal
Trees
Issue Date: 2014
metadata.dc.publisher.journal: Mycorrhiza
metadata.dc.relation.ispartof: Volume 24, Número 1, Pags. 21-32
Abstract: Little attention has been paid to plant mutualistic interactions in the Amazon rainforest, and the general pattern of occurrence and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in these ecosystems is largely unknown. This study investigated AMF communities through their spores in soil in a 'terra firme forest' in Central Amazonia. The contribution played by abiotic factors and plant host species identity in regulating the composition, abundance and diversity of such communities along a topographic gradient with different soils and hydrology was also evaluated. Forty-one spore morphotypes were observed with species belonging to the genera Glomus and Acaulospora, representing 44% of the total taxa. Soil texture and moisture, together with host identity, were predominant factors responsible for shaping AMF communities along the pedo-hydrological gradient. However, the variability within AMF communities was largely associated with shifts in the relative abundance of spores rather than changes in species composition, confirming that common AMF species are widely distributed in plant communities and all plants recruited into the forest are likely to be exposed to the dominant sporulating AMF species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1007/s00572-013-0507-x
Appears in Collections:Artigos

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.