Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/17926
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dc.contributor.authorAndrade Filho, Valdir Soares de-
dc.contributor.authorArtaxo, Paulo-
dc.contributor.authorHacon, S. S.-
dc.contributor.authorCarmo, Cleber Nascimento do-
dc.contributor.authorCirino, Glauber G.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-15T21:50:10Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-15T21:50:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/17926-
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the effects of fine particulate matter emitted through biomass burning on hospitalizations for respiratory diseases in children living in Manaus, Northern Brazil. Descriptive study with ecologic time series design carried out in Manaus from 2002 to 2009. Hospital admission data were obtained from the Unified Health System database. PM2.5 levels were estimated using aerosol remote sensing through the measurement of aerosol optical depth at a wavelength of 550 nm. Statistical methods were used in the data analysis, with Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression between variables, with a 95% confidence interval. The region of Manaus showed low PM2.5 concentrations when compared to the Southern Amazonian region. Between August and November (dry period in the region), was when the highest mean levels of PM2.5, estimated between 18 to 23 μg/m3, and the largest number of fires were observed. For the rainy season, an average of 12 μg/m3, 66% lower than the dry season measurements (20.6 μg/m3) was observed. The highest rates of hospitalization were observed during the rainy season and April was the month with the highest levels at 2.51/1,000 children. A positive association between hospital admissions and relative humidity (R = 0.126; p-value = 0.005) was observed, while the association between admissions and PM2.5 was negative and statistically significant (R = -0.168; p-value = 0.003). The R 2 of the final model (Hospitalizations = 2.19*Humidity - 1.60*PM2.5 - 0.23*Precipitation) explained 84% of hospitalizations due to respiratory disease in children living in Manaus, considering the independent variables statistically significant (humidity, PM2.5, and precipitation). Hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in children in Manaus, were more related to weather conditions and in particular relative humidity, than to exposure to aerosols emitted by biomass burning in the Amazonian region.en
dc.language.isopt_BRpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofVolume 47, Número 2, Pags. 239-247pt_BR
dc.rightsRestrito*
dc.subjectAerosolen
dc.subjectParticulate Matteren
dc.subjectAerosolen
dc.subjectBiomassen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectEnvironmental Monitoringen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectFireen
dc.subjectHospitalizationen
dc.subjectHumanen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMedical Information Systemen
dc.subjectMeteorological Phenomenaen
dc.subjectParticulate Matteren
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectRespiratory Tract Diseasesen
dc.subjectStatistical Modelen
dc.subjectStatistics And Numerical Dataen
dc.subjectAerosolsen
dc.subjectBiomassen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Monitoringen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectFiresen
dc.subjectHealth Information Systemsen
dc.subjectHospitalizationen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectLinear Modelsen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMeteorological Conceptsen
dc.subjectNational Health Programsen
dc.subjectParticulate Matteren
dc.subjectRespiratory Tract Diseasesen
dc.titleAerosols from biomass burning and respiratory diseases in children, Manaus, Northern Brazil.en
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.publisher.journalRevista de Saúde Públicapt_BR
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