Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/18593
Title: The cost-effectiveness of biodiversity surveys in tropical forests
Authors: Gardner, Toby Alan
Barlow, Jos
Araújo, Ivanei Souza
Ávila-Pires, Teresa Cristina Sauer
Bonaldo, Alexandre Bragio
Costa, Joana E.
Espósito, Maria Cristina
Ferreira, Leandro Valle
Hawes, Joseph E.
Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina
Hoogmoed, Marinus Steven
Leite, Rafael N.
Lo-Man-Hung, N. F.
Malcolm, Jay R.
Martíns, Marlúcia Bonifácio
Mestre, Luiz Augusto Macedo
Miranda-Santos, Ronildon
Overal, William L.
Parry, Luke
Peters, Sandra L.
Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A.
Silva, Maria Nazareth Ferreira da
Motta, Catarina da Silva
Peres, Carlos A.
Keywords: Beetle
Biodiversity
Bird
Cost-benefit Analysis
Estimation Method
Identification Method
Tropical Forest
Animals
Biodiversity
Bird
Brasil
Cost-benefit Analysis
Economics
Environmental Protection
Information Processing
Insect
Mammal
Methodology
Physiology
Plant
Time
Tree
Tropic Climate
Animal
Biodiversity
Birds
Brasil
Conservation Of Natural Resources
Cost-benefit Analysis
Data Collection
Insects
Mammals
Plants
Time Factors
Trees
Tropical Climate
Amazonas
Brasil
South America
Aves
Coleoptera
Issue Date: 2008
metadata.dc.publisher.journal: Ecology Letters
metadata.dc.relation.ispartof: Volume 11, Número 2, Pags. 139-150
Abstract: The identification of high-performance indicator taxa that combine practical feasibility and ecological value requires an understanding of the costs and benefits of surveying different taxa. We present a generic and novel framework for identifying such taxa, and illustrate our approach using a large-scale assessment of 14 different higher taxa across three forest types in the Brazilian Amazon, estimating both the standardized survey cost and the ecological and biodiversity indicator value for each taxon. Survey costs varied by three orders of magnitude, and dung beetles and birds were identified as especially suitable for evaluating and monitoring the ecological consequences of habitat change in our study region. However, an exclusive focus on such taxa occurs at the expense of understanding patterns of diversity in other groups. To improve the cost-effectiveness of biodiversity research we encourage a combination of clearer research goals and the use of an objective evidence-based approach to selecting study taxa. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2007.01133.x
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