Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/18832
Title: Influence of habitat, litter type, and soil invertebrates on leaf-litter decomposition in a fragmented Amazonian landscape
Authors: Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.
Laurance, William F.
Keywords: Carbon
Nitrogen
Decomposition
Edge Effect
Habitat Fragmentation
Leaf Litter
Secondary Forest
Soil Fauna
Analysis Of Variance
Animals
Brasil
Comparative Study
Ecosystem
Environment
Invertebrate
Metabolism
Physiology
Plant Leaf
Soil
Tree
Analysis Of Variance
Animal
Brasil
Carbon
Ecosystem
Environment
Invertebrates
Nitrogen
Plant Leaves
Soil
Trees
Amazonia
South America
Western Hemisphere
World
Invertebrata
Issue Date: 2005
metadata.dc.publisher.journal: Oecologia
metadata.dc.relation.ispartof: Volume 144, Número 3, Pags. 456-462
Abstract: Amazonian forest fragments and second-growth forests often differ substantially from undisturbed forests in their microclimate, plant-species composition, and soil fauna. To determine if these changes could affect litter decomposition, we quantified the mass loss of two contrasting leaf-litter mixtures, in the presence or absence of soil macroinvertebrates, and in three forest habitats. Leaf-litter decomposition rates in second-growth forests (> 10 years old) and in fragment edges (< 100 m from the edge) did not differ from that in the forest interior (> 250 m from the edges of primary forests). In all three habitats, experimental exclusion of soil invertebrates resulted in slower decomposition rates. Faunal-exclosure effects were stronger for litter of the primary forest, composed mostly of leaves of old-growth trees, than for litter of second-growth forests, which was dominated by leaves of successional species. The latter had a significantly lower initial concentration of N, higher C:N and lignin:N ratios, and decomposed at a slower rate than did litter from forest interiors. Our results indicate that land-cover changes in Amazonia affect decomposition mainly through changes in plant species composition, which in turn affect litter quality. Similar effects may occur on fragment edges, particularly on very disturbed edges, where successional trees become dominant. The drier microclimatic conditions in fragment edges and second-growth forests (> 10 years old) did not appear to inhibit decomposition. Finally, although soil invertebrates play a key role in leaf-litter decomposition, we found no evidence that differences in the abundance, species richness, or species composition of invertebrates between disturbed and undisturbed forests significantly altered decomposition rates. © Springer-Verlag 2005.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1007/s00442-005-0117-1
Appears in Collections:Artigos

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.