Use este identificador para citar ou linkar para este item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/17439
Título: An ethnobotanical study of anti-malarial plants among indigenous people on the upper Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon
Autor: Frausin, Gina
Hidalgo, Ari de Freitas
Lima, Renata Braga Souza
Kinupp, Valdely Ferreira
Ming, Linchau
Pohlit, Adrian Martin
Milliken, William
Palavras-chave: Antimalarial Agent
Aspidosperma Desmanthum Extract
Aspidosperma Olivaceum Extract
Aspidosperma Vargasii Extract
Carapa Guianensis Aubl Extract
Croton Cajucara Benth Extract
Cymbopogon Citratus Extract
Euterpe Precatoria Mart Extract
Insect Repellent
Plant Extract
Quassia Amara Extract
Stachytarpheta Cayennensis Extract
Sweet Orange Extract
Unclassified Drug
Antimalarial Agent
Acanthospermum
Ampelozizyphus Amazonicus
Ampelozizyphus Amazonicus Extract
Anadenanthera Peregrina
Anemia
Aniba Canelilla
Antimalarial Activity
Araceae
Arecaceae
Aspidosperma
Asteraceae
Astrocaryum Aculeatum
Astrocaryum Mumbaca
Avocado
Bark
Beet
Bidens Cynapiifolia Kunth
Bignoniaceae
Black Pepper
Bonamia Ferruginea
Brazil Nut
Brazilian
Carapa Guianensis
Cecropia
Chenopodium Ambrosioides
Community Structure
Convolvulaceae
Costaceae
Costus Spicatus
Crassulaceae
Croton Cajucara Benth
Croton Sacaquinha Croizat
Cucurbitaceae
Cymbopogon Citratus
Drug Dosage Form
Endopleura Uchi
Eryngium Foetidum
Erythroxylaceae
Erythroxylum Coca Lam
Eugenia Uniflora
Euphorbiaceae
Euterpe Oleracea Mart
Euterpe Precatoria Mart
Fabaceae
Female
Fever
Forest
Fridericia Chica
Genipa Americana
Guarea Pubescens
Headache
Heteropsis
Human
Indigenous People
Kalanchoe Pinnata
Lauraceae
Lime (fruit)
Lippia Alba
Luffa Operculata
Malaria
Male
Malvaceae
Manihot Esculenta Crantz
Medicinal Plant
Meliaceae
Menispermaceae
Myrtaceae
Nonhuman
Passiflora
Philodendron Goeldii
Physalis Angulata
Plant Leaf
Plant Root
Plasmodium Falciparum
Plasmodium Vivax
Plectranthus
Portulaca Pilosa
Prophylaxis
Quassia Amara
Senna
Simaroubaceae
Solanaceae
Sour Orange
Stachytarpheta Cayennensis
Sweet Orange
Theobroma Subincanum
Uncaria Guianensis
Verbenaceae
Vernonia Condensata Baker
Wetland
Wild Species
American Indian
Ampelopsis
Ethnobotany
Ethnology
Isolation And Purification
Malaria
Procedures
Questionnaires
River
Ampelozizyphus Amazonicus
Aspidosperma
Ampelopsis
Antimalarials
Aspidosperma
Ethnobotany
Female
Humans
Indians, South American
Malaria
Male
Plants, Medicinal
Rivers
Surveys And Questionnaires
Data do documento: 2015
Revista: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Encontra-se em: Volume 174, Pags. 238-252
Abstract: Background In this article we present the plants used for the treatment of malaria and associated symptoms in Santa Isabel do Rio Negro in the Brazilian Amazon. The region has important biological and cultural diversities including more than twenty indigenous ethnic groups and a strong history in traditional medicine. Objective The aims of this study are to survey information in the Baniwa, Baré, Desana, Piratapuia, Tariana, Tukano, Tuyuca and Yanomami ethnic communities and among caboclos (mixed-ethnicity) on (a) plant species used for the treatment of malaria and associated symptoms, (b) dosage forms and (c) distribution of these anti-malarial plants in the Amazon. Methods Information was obtained through classical ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacological methods from interviews with 146 informants in Santa Isabel municipality on the upper Negro River, Brazil. Results Fifty-five mainly native neotropical plant species from 34 families were in use. The detailed uses of these plants were documented. The result was 187 records (64.5%) of plants for the specific treatment of malaria, 51 records (17.6%) of plants used in the treatment of liver problems and 29 records (10.0%) of plants used in the control of fevers associated with malaria. Other uses described were blood fortification ('dar sangue'), headache and prophylaxis. Most of the therapeutic preparations were decoctions and infusions based on stem bark, root bark and leaves. These were administered by mouth. In some cases, remedies were prepared with up to three different plant species. Also, plants were used together with other ingredients such as insects, mammals, gunpowder and milk. Conclusion This is the first study on the anti-malarial plants from this region of the Amazon. Aspidosperma spp. and Ampelozizyphus amazonicus Ducke were the most cited species in the communities surveyed. These species have experimental proof supporting their anti-malarial efficacy. The dosage of the therapeutic preparations depends on the kind of plant, quantity of plant material available, the patient's age (children and adults) and the local expert. The treatment time varies from a single dose to up to several weeks. Most anti-malarial plants are domesticated or grow spontaneously. They are grown in home gardens, open areas near the communities, clearings and secondary forests, and wild species grow in areas of seasonally flooded wetlands and terra firme ('solid ground') forest, in some cases in locations that are hard to access. Traditional knowledge of plants was found to be falling into disuse presumably as a consequence of the local official health services that treat malaria in the communities using commercial drugs. Despite this, some species are used in the prevention of this disease and also in the recovery after using conventional anti-malarial drugs. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2015.07.033
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