Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.inpa.gov.br/handle/1/18059
Title: Arthropods associated with nests of Cacicus sp. and Psarocolius sp. (Passerida: Icteridae) in varzea forest near the meeting of the rivers Negro and Solimões (Central Amazonia, Brazil) at high water
Authors: Gouveia, Fernando Bernardo Pinto
Barbosa, Márcio Luís Leitão
Barrett, Toby Vincent
Keywords: Arthropod
Faunistics
Flooding
Functional Group
Heating
Nest Site
Passerine
Refuge
Survival
Taxonomy
Vertical Migration
Amazonas
Brasil
Rio Negro [south America]
Solimoes River
Arachnida
Arthropoda
Aves
Blattaria
Cacicus
Icteridae
Passerida
Psarocolius
Pseudoscorpiones
Issue Date: 2012
metadata.dc.publisher.journal: Journal of Natural History
metadata.dc.relation.ispartof: Volume 46, Número 15-16, Pags. 979-1003
Abstract: We analysed the arthropod fauna from nine nests of Cacicus sp. and nine nests of Psarocolius sp. (Passerida: Icteridae), in the varzea forest of Central Amazonia, Brazil, during high water, establishing these nests as one of the probable refuges for several arthropods performing vertical migration during periods of flooding and high water, besides discussing the role of these arthropods in the nests. We also evaluate the effectiveness of the extraction of arthropods from nests using an apparatus based on the Berlese-Tullgren funnel. We obtained 15,128 arthropods from three subphyla, five classes and 16 orders. The nests were shown as complex ecosystems sheltering groups from different functional and trophic categories and revealed striking differences from those of terra firma, remarkably in Blattaria, Arachnida and Pseudoscorpiones. The increasing volume of the funnel and time of heat exposure was shown to be appropriate for extraction of the arthropods from the bulky nests of these birds. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1080/00222933.2011.651642
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